laboratoryequipment:

Additive Makes Antibiotics Stand Up to MRSAResearchers from North Carolina State Univ. have increased the potency of a compound that reactivates antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant form of Staphylococcus that is notoriously difficult to treat. Their improved compound removes the bacteria’s antibiotic resistance and allows the antibiotic to once again become effective at normal dosage levels.NC State chemist Christian Melander had previously proven the effectiveness of a 2-aminoimidazole compound in reactivating antibiotics against resistant bacterial strains. However, the original compound was not potent enough. In his latest work, described in a paper appearing in Angewandte Chemie, Melander, Assistant Prof. Roberta Worthington and graduate student Tyler Harris have solved the potency issue, bringing them one step closer to in vivo testing.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/additive-makes-antibiotics-stand-mrsa

laboratoryequipment:

Additive Makes Antibiotics Stand Up to MRSA

Researchers from North Carolina State Univ. have increased the potency of a compound that reactivates antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant form of Staphylococcus that is notoriously difficult to treat. Their improved compound removes the bacteria’s antibiotic resistance and allows the antibiotic to once again become effective at normal dosage levels.

NC State chemist Christian Melander had previously proven the effectiveness of a 2-aminoimidazole compound in reactivating antibiotics against resistant bacterial strains. However, the original compound was not potent enough. In his latest work, described in a paper appearing in Angewandte Chemie, Melander, Assistant Prof. Roberta Worthington and graduate student Tyler Harris have solved the potency issue, bringing them one step closer to in vivo testing.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/additive-makes-antibiotics-stand-mrsa

fuckyeahpharmacology:

Valinomycin
Antibiotic.. Has a cool structure.. is an ionophore.. binds K+ ions which sit in the centre of the molecule and takes them across the cell membrane and deposits them outside of the cell screwing up the cells ionic equilibrium which kills the cell 
But theyre not selective for bacteria and also have an effect on mammalian cells so theyre used for research purposes only and not therapeutically 

fuckyeahpharmacology:

Valinomycin

Antibiotic.. Has a cool structure.. is an ionophore.. binds K+ ions which sit in the centre of the molecule and takes them across the cell membrane and deposits them outside of the cell screwing up the cells ionic equilibrium which kills the cell 

But theyre not selective for bacteria and also have an effect on mammalian cells so theyre used for research purposes only and not therapeutically 

hay and sort of things: Drug facts: 10 facts about amoxicillin

hayandsortofthings:

I’m going to be doing a new series of posts on drug facts. My pharmacy posts have been pretty boring and pointless in the past so please let me know if you would like me to continue with these.

The idea is that I can refresh my own knowledge while pick out key ‘take home messages’ about drugs…

We’re studying tetracycline antibiotics in Microbiology class. Because in Pharmacy school, ANY subject is an excuse to study even more organic chemistry. There’s no such thing as too much o-chem! And since we’re pharmacy students and not biology students, our Micro classes don’t focus as much on the etiology or evolutionary traits of bacteria and viruses; but rather they tend to focus on a) their structural characteristics and life cycle and b) how to use this knowledge to design drugs to get rid of them.

We’re studying tetracycline antibiotics in Microbiology class. Because in Pharmacy school, ANY subject is an excuse to study even more organic chemistry. There’s no such thing as too much o-chem! And since we’re pharmacy students and not biology students, our Micro classes don’t focus as much on the etiology or evolutionary traits of bacteria and viruses; but rather they tend to focus on a) their structural characteristics and life cycle and b) how to use this knowledge to design drugs to get rid of them.